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Posts from the ‘Digital Marketing’ Category

MarketingProfs – How to Write the Most Effective Social Media Posts [Infographic]

 

 

 

By Laura Forer

December 14, 2017

Questions abound about social media posts: How long should my post be? How many hashtags should I include? Is an image always necessary?

Today’s infographic, by CoSchedule, answers those questions, based on an analysis of nearly 6.4 million posts and 11 unique studies.

The team at the marketing calendar software company compiled that information and sorted it to answer these four questions for six social media platforms:

  1. Which type of message (text, text-plus-link, or image) is most effective?
  2. How many characters per post garner the most engagement?
  3. How many hashtags are most effective?
  4. Are emojis useful, and, if so, how many should be included?

For example, Facebook posts that are text with a link are the most effective type of Facebook post, with images coming in second, and simple text posts coming in third, according to the data in the infographic. That’s not to say text-only posts are ineffective, just that the other types are more effective, on average.

As for character count, posts with 111 characters perform the best on Facebook, on average, followed by posts with 119 characters, and posts with 40 characters. Again, a 40-word post is not ineffective; that length came in third in the analysis, so 40-character posts actually perform quite well, on average.

See Full Story and Infographic: http://ow.ly/ESaX30hgd70

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TechCrunch – Snapchat starts algorithm-personalized redesign splitting social and media

 

 

 

 

 

By

November 29, 2017

 

By putting best friends first and dividing them from professional publishers, Snapchat hopes to conquer Instagram and revive its own growth with a big redesign that begins rolling out Friday. And it looks great. Snapchat is finally personalizing, highlighting the most relevant content so it’s easier to consume.

“We are separating the social from the media, and taking an important step forward towards strengthening our relationships with our friends and our relationships with the media” Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel wrote in an Axios op-ed this morning. Rather than sorting content by how popular it is with everyone else like Facebook or by reverse chronological order like Snapchat used to, Snap will mold itself to what each person watches most, like Netflix.

Even if Snapchat struggles to add more users amidst Facebook’s competition, its new algorithms could get loyalists spending even more time and seeing more ads in the app. A small percentage of users worldwide on iOS and Android will start getting the new Snapchat on Friday, earlier than expected, and it should be rolled out to everyone within a few weeks.

So what exactly is the redesign? It puts all messages and Stories from friends to the left of the camera, sorted by who you talk to and view most. It revives auto-advance, so you can watch everyone’s Stories in a row, but with best friends not people who post the most first. And it puts all premium publishers, pro social media stars you follow, and aggregated stories from search and Snap Map in the Discover section to the right of the camera, curated by humans, and sorted by your past viewing behavior.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/SmBM30gTR8J

Hacker Noon – Tech CEOs, founders, and VCs react to 280 characters on Twitter

 

 

 

Andreas Sandre

November 16, 2017

 

Yesterday on LinkedIn, Jeff Weiner, the company’s CEO, commented on the new 280 character format on Twitter.

“May not be fun to parse & read tweets at that length but must admit it’s a lot easier to write,” Weiner wrote on LinkedIn after posting his first 280 character tweet.

I thought it was interesting to see a tech CEO commenting on Twitter’s new format. And I asked myself: what are other Silicon Valley and tech industry leaders saying about Twitter’s most-talked-about evolution?

So, I decided to dig a little bit deeper.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/HECJ30gDuaY

Forbes – Eight Steps To Develop And Maintain Your Content Marketing Strategy

 

 

 

By Elyse Flynn Meyer

September 28, 2017


Have you ever completed a marketing campaign and realized that, while it may have been a success, it will be difficult to replicate because there wasn’t a defined strategy or process behind it? If so, you’re not alone.

Comprehensive marketing campaigns can have 10 to 30+ individual content-related tactics that need to be executed to make them integrated and cohesive campaigns. These content-driven tactics are usually being executed in tandem to ensure all the pieces fit together to build a campaign that is going to drive traffic, leads and new customers to your organization.

Most importantly, it is critical to ensure you are not only building a content strategy that is repeatable but that you have something that is documented and understood by all members of your team. When the campaign is over and it’s time to analyze the results, a gaping hole often becomes evident: There was no documented strategy to drive the tactics. This scenario helps explain the statistics that only 37% of B2B marketers say they have a documented content marketing strategy. In the absence of a strategy, we see that while marketers have the best intentions, sometimes these operational pieces get missed. This tends to leave a gap in your department that could become detrimental as your team changes over time.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/tyRD30fvkET

Adweek – 3 Tips for Creating Original Social Content Your Audience Loves

September 20, 2017

 

Opinion: The nature of social media puts a lot of pressure on businesses to constantly create content

Originality and creativity are important words when it comes to creating and sharing content on social media. Why is it, then, that so many companies continually share lifeless content? If you’re one of these brands, then it’s time to make a change.

What does your content-creation process look like? For some, the process involves sitting in front of a computer screen, fingers on the keyboard, waiting for inspiration for an article that will be published later that day. Others take a more meticulous approach and spend time brainstorming and creating content calendars weeks or months in advance.

Some content writers are spontaneous, while others are very disciplined. Unfortunately, most brands have content writers and social media marketers who also happen to be unoriginal. The content they create and share may technically be original in the sense that the exact combination of words and sentences can’t be found elsewhere, but it tends to be regurgitated from other sources. The result is a social media presence that lacks creativity and fails to engage the audience.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/eMnO30fhGDl