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Posts from the ‘Marketing’ Category

MarketingProfs – Artificial Intelligence: A Detailed Overview [Infographic]

 

 

 

By Vahe Habeshian
June 11, 2019

Science fiction is quickly becoming everyday reality. Chatbots, robots, digital assistants, automated vehicles, virtual assistants, and much more… are the products of artificial intelligence (AI), which is already transforming entire industries.

An infographic by TechJury, provider of one-step tech guides and product reviews, provides a detailed overview of AI.

The infographic begins with a timeline of AI, starting in the mid-20th century with the “father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence,” Alan Turing, who developed the “Turing test” for determining what qualifies as artificial intelligence.

The infographic goes on to outline various classifications of AI, provides examples of AI technology, highlights statistics about the AI market, and lists the companies and countries at the forefront of the AI race.

It concludes with AI’s current impact on and uses of AI in 20+ industries, as well as future uses of AI.

Check out this thorough overview of the current state of AI, all in one (long) infographic:

See full story & infographic: http://ow.ly/8J8S30oWyYs

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Buffer – Why Isn’t Anyone Talking About Live Video Anymore? The Current State of Live

 

 

 

By Heather-Mae Pusztai

Live video remains a core feature of the top social networks, but have you noticed that the live video buzz may have cooled?

Why isn’t anyone talking about live video anymore?

How should you be thinking about live video and your social media strategy in 2019?

We believe there are still significant opportunities to use live video to your advantage. This week on the Science of Social Media, we hope to give you some fresh perspectives and ideas on what live video could look like for you and your brand in 2019.

See full story: http://ow.ly/Nq1j30oBEVv

MarketingProfs – Four Writing Lessons From Dr. Seuss: Create Instantly Memorable Marketing Copy

 

 

 

By Lisa Shomo
February 25, 2019

Dr. Seuss Day is coming up on March 2. Could you create effective marketing copy by imposing limits on how you write—as Dr. Seuss did? Should you?

For his best-selling children’s book Green Eggs and Ham, Seuss set himself a strict limit of only 50 words. Considering that he successfully got an entire generation of kids learning to read and having fun doing it, his writing techniques are worth examining.

Using literary devices you wouldn’t normally use might hem in your writing ability—or completely unleash it.

Seuss not only used small amounts of simple words, but also explored repetition, alliteration, and rhyme, and he invented new words while crafting his stories. Kids couldn’t get enough.

As we celebrate Dr. Seuss Day, what can we learn from him?

 

1. Rhyming helps solidify memory

Why is it that you can remember marketing slogans from 5, 15, or even 35 years ago, but you can’t seem to remember anything on the shopping list you left at home? I wager that many, if not nearly all, those memorable slogans rhymed.

Rhyming is the literary device that most people associate with the works of Dr. Seuss. Rhyme turns out to be a powerful element that made his books both treasured and unforgettable.

Children—heck, even adults—are able to rattle off line after line of Seuss’s books. And that was his intention: getting kids to connect the words on the page with sounds they hear in their mind and say out loud. When words in a phrase or series of lines sound alike, it is much easier to connect the words together and to remember them.

See full story: http://ow.ly/5ZuF30nPsvJ

Contently – If Half of Web Traffic Is Fake, Good Content Marketing Is Even More Important

 

 

 

 

By Emily Gaudette

January 16th, 2019

In December, New York Magazine dropped an atom bomb on digital media. And no, I don’t mean this story on Snapchat filters for dogs.

The day after Christmas, tech reporter Max Read analyzed and synthesized reports from the Justice Department, a New York Times report on follower factories, one of many lawsuits against Facebook, a list from MarketingLand, and takedowns of YouTube, Instagram influencers, and deepfakes, all to conclude that digital metrics are fake and overinflated. We’re all just soaked in a seven layer dip of made-up, falsified baloney.

According to the article, roughly half of traffic and engagement is fraudulent. As if that wasn’t damning enough, Reddit’s ex-CEO Ellen Pao shared the article on Twitter, adding, “It’s all true: Everything is fake.” For many of us who make a living analyzing web metrics, it was a confusing time. I stopped checking Twitter for a full week, sitting in my kitchen like Dr. Manhattan on the moon, asking myself why I didn’t just go to law school.

See full story: http://ow.ly/o1Cv30nmV0w

MarketingProfs – Get Started on Your Social Media Plan (Because It Matters to Your Customer Marketing)

 

 

 

By Sandra Gudat
January 14, 2019

Your company probably has a social media presence. But if you’re not incorporating social media into your customer marketing strategy, you could be missing out.

After all, you’ve spent valuable time and money building your customer base, and you’ve also worked to amass a growing community of followers on your social media channels. But have you integrated those efforts in an effort to expand your customer base, keep current customers engaged, and increase profits?

Take the following three steps to help you make sure you do.

1. Develop a social media marketing plan

Without a plan, your social activity runs the risk of turning off customers instead of turning them in, derailing corporate objectives, and tarnishing your company’s reputation.

So, no matter where you are in the social moment, take time now to evaluate (or create) your strategy, keeping the following in mind:

Check your goals. Social efforts must support corporate and marketing goals, from big-picture aims (building brand awareness, boosting revenue) to short-term targets (generating event attendance, maximizing offer response).

See full story: http://ow.ly/QMCl30njowB