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Posts from the ‘Social Media’ Category

MarketingProfs – How to Write the Most Effective Social Media Posts [Infographic]

 

 

 

By Laura Forer

December 14, 2017

Questions abound about social media posts: How long should my post be? How many hashtags should I include? Is an image always necessary?

Today’s infographic, by CoSchedule, answers those questions, based on an analysis of nearly 6.4 million posts and 11 unique studies.

The team at the marketing calendar software company compiled that information and sorted it to answer these four questions for six social media platforms:

  1. Which type of message (text, text-plus-link, or image) is most effective?
  2. How many characters per post garner the most engagement?
  3. How many hashtags are most effective?
  4. Are emojis useful, and, if so, how many should be included?

For example, Facebook posts that are text with a link are the most effective type of Facebook post, with images coming in second, and simple text posts coming in third, according to the data in the infographic. That’s not to say text-only posts are ineffective, just that the other types are more effective, on average.

As for character count, posts with 111 characters perform the best on Facebook, on average, followed by posts with 119 characters, and posts with 40 characters. Again, a 40-word post is not ineffective; that length came in third in the analysis, so 40-character posts actually perform quite well, on average.

See Full Story and Infographic: http://ow.ly/ESaX30hgd70

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TechCrunch – Snapchat starts algorithm-personalized redesign splitting social and media

 

 

 

 

 

By

November 29, 2017

 

By putting best friends first and dividing them from professional publishers, Snapchat hopes to conquer Instagram and revive its own growth with a big redesign that begins rolling out Friday. And it looks great. Snapchat is finally personalizing, highlighting the most relevant content so it’s easier to consume.

“We are separating the social from the media, and taking an important step forward towards strengthening our relationships with our friends and our relationships with the media” Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel wrote in an Axios op-ed this morning. Rather than sorting content by how popular it is with everyone else like Facebook or by reverse chronological order like Snapchat used to, Snap will mold itself to what each person watches most, like Netflix.

Even if Snapchat struggles to add more users amidst Facebook’s competition, its new algorithms could get loyalists spending even more time and seeing more ads in the app. A small percentage of users worldwide on iOS and Android will start getting the new Snapchat on Friday, earlier than expected, and it should be rolled out to everyone within a few weeks.

So what exactly is the redesign? It puts all messages and Stories from friends to the left of the camera, sorted by who you talk to and view most. It revives auto-advance, so you can watch everyone’s Stories in a row, but with best friends not people who post the most first. And it puts all premium publishers, pro social media stars you follow, and aggregated stories from search and Snap Map in the Discover section to the right of the camera, curated by humans, and sorted by your past viewing behavior.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/SmBM30gTR8J

Hacker Noon – Tech CEOs, founders, and VCs react to 280 characters on Twitter

 

 

 

Andreas Sandre

November 16, 2017

 

Yesterday on LinkedIn, Jeff Weiner, the company’s CEO, commented on the new 280 character format on Twitter.

“May not be fun to parse & read tweets at that length but must admit it’s a lot easier to write,” Weiner wrote on LinkedIn after posting his first 280 character tweet.

I thought it was interesting to see a tech CEO commenting on Twitter’s new format. And I asked myself: what are other Silicon Valley and tech industry leaders saying about Twitter’s most-talked-about evolution?

So, I decided to dig a little bit deeper.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/HECJ30gDuaY

TechCrunch – LinkedIn rolls out its Career Advice mentoring program to US, UK and India

 

 

 

 

By 

November 15, 2017

LinkedIn, the Microsoft-owned social platform for the working world with some 530 million members, has made a big push in the last couple of years to position itself not just as a place to look for new jobs and network, but as a place for professional development — including services for online learning; steady streams of news and other content to expand your knowledge; and most recently help with building your resume. Today, it’s taking the wraps off the latest product in that effort: users in the US, UK and India will now be able to use LinkedIn to connect with mentors to help coach them on how to steer themselves in their careers, free of charge.

Career Advice, as the new product is called, is the full roll out of an online mentoring service that LinkedIn launched in a limited format this past summer, in San Francisco and Australia. The idea is to connect users with mentors who can help them figure out anything to do with their career, whether it’s ideas on how to find a new job, feedback for why they are not getting ahead or feeling satisfied at work, and maybe even to pivot to a new career altogether.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/4FY330gBOt1

Contently – Infographic: The Science of Brand Voice

 

 

 

By Jordan Teicher

October 10, 2017

Whenever I talk to brand marketers, I always make sure to ask them one question: How is your content different than what your competitors create?

It’s a simple ask, but I’ve noticed that people have trouble answering it. And a lot of them sound the same. They mention things like truly caring about the customers and using an authentic voice. If all companies use those goals to guide their creative process, then they’re not really differentiating themselves in a meaningful way.

However, for the brands that do have a distinct voice, this question is easy. Marketers can rattle off specific adjectives like trustworthy, straightforward, or irreverent. Contently’s brand voice, which we aim to convey in every post on The Content Strategist, is supposed to be friendly, smart, conversational, with a touch of humor.

That unique voice has become so important because of how much content gets posted online every day. Brands can control two factors: what you say and how you say it. But the “what” in that equation only has so much flexibility. If you’re a bank or news outlet that covers finance, you have to write about saving for retirement. How you do that is the difference between building a loyal audience and fading into the crowd.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/17ai30fMkIx