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Posts from the ‘Website Design’ Category

Tech.Co – Social Media News: Facebook Gets GIFs, Twitter Goes Round

 

 

 

 

June 20, 2017

By Elliot Volkman

In the ever changing world of social media, few updates drastically change how we interact with them. This week however marks a new notch on the timeline for two massive updates for both Facebook and Twitter, both of which you have undoubtedly already seen. For starters, Facebook has made using GIFs even easier, and Twitter unveiled a new user interface on their website and mobile application.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/5EXI30cKHl3

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Hootsuite – What 20,000 Tweets Taught Us About Twitter Images 

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May 25, 2015

By Evan Lepage

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Scroll through your Twitter feed. Which messages catch your eye? The ones with great images, right?

Every Tweet that you send without an attached image is a missed opportunity. But simply throwing an image on every Tweet isn’t enough anymore. If you’re trying to separate yourself from the noise, choosing the right image is essential.

Of course, just as there are a number of factors which make certain images more effective than others on social media, the success of a Tweet is based on even greater number of factors: the composition of your audience, the substance and quality of your content, the Tweet copy and the images. All of these factors are important—you can’t rely on one and hope it will compensate for the others.

For this reason, it’s vital that you learn what works for you by testing all of these factors individually and analyzing the results. We do this every day, and breaking down the performance of thousands of Tweets has allowed us to hone in on Twitter images specifically.

Here are 5 good and 5 bad Twitter images and what they taught us about choosing visuals for Tweets.

Lessons from 5 good Twitter images

Words within images—A killer combination

The old cliche ‘an image is worth 1,000 words’ seems very poignant when you’re limited to 140 characters. However, when your image is placed in a stream with 1,000 other images, that value might not be so obvious to your followers. On Twitter, we may need to update that expression to “an image with words is worth 1,000 clicks.”

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This may come as a surprise to some, but Twitter images that combine text with photos or design are actually quite powerful for two main reasons.

First, words force a user to slow down their scrolling, to take an extra second or two to look at your Tweet. This is exactly what you want, since those extra few seconds of attention are far more likely to lead to social media engagement or a click on your link. If you can make a person stop scrolling, your Twitter image has done its job. The above image isn’t particularly appealing from an aesthetic standpoint, but people stopped to read the text in each level of the pyramid and because they stopped many of them ended up on our blog. In addition to the over 180 retweets and 120 favorites, the url within that Tweet was clicked 1,274 times—significantly above our average click-through.

The second reason images with words are so powerful is that words add context. When you’re so limited by space, you might want to have a great image that isn’t necessarily explained by the Tweet copy or vice versa. By including text within the image, you get to add context so that your Tweet copy can be self-sustaining. This saves you precious characters and allows you to focus on making both the text and the images as strong as they can be.

Get things moving—Use gifs

When people are scrolling through their Twitter feeds, how long do you think you have to capture their attention? Five seconds? Three seconds? One second? Your image needs to pack a serious punch in that very short time span, which is what makes gifs such an effective tool on Twitter.

Regardless of how you pronounce them, gifs are a powerful visual tool because of their short duration and how they stand-out an otherwise largely static page. Gifs don’t autoplay on Twitter, but that big play symbol has proven to be tempting enough to stop people in their tracks. We’ve found that gifs increase our engagements on Tweets, specifically the number of people who share and retweet our messages. The following Tweet was retweeted and favorited over 80 times respectively, and drew over 760 link clicks.

We created the above gif ourselves, which is great for businesses that have the resources. Unfortunately many businesses don’t have the resources or know-how, so a gif database like giphy.com is worth bookmarking. You can find a gif for almost any situation or context. Generally gifs lean towards the humorous, as well, which is a positive since people respond to humor on social media.

Of course, you shouldn’t be using gifs for every post, and maybe not even every day. Use them sparingly, only when they really fit the content, and they’ll come as a surprise and a treat to your followers.

Image cliches are cliches because they work

When someone makes a joke about social media and images, it probably involves a cute animal, a meal or a sunset. These images do make up a large part of what you’ll see on social media, so you should avoid them right? The opposite is true. They are cliches for a reason: because people love them. People love looking at food and cute animals. They love laughing at the same memes over and over again. If you use images that fall into these categories, you’re probably going to increase your engagement. It works for us.

In the social media and tech worlds, a desk shot—often an overhead image of a laptop on a pretty wooden surface—has become pretty cliched. And we absolutely use this style of image on Twitter, to great success.

See full story: http://ow.ly/Ngo6n

 

 

Buffer – 10 Things We’ve Learned About Social Media in 2014

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December 29, 2014

By Kevan Lee

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One of the best ways I’ve found to learn new things on social media is to try new things. We experiment, we make mistakes. We succeed, and we fail. And we get a better feeling for how things might work and the best strategies, ideas, and experiments to try next.

I’ve had the privilege of trying out a number of these new strategies and experiments this year, learning tons about the best way to share on social media.

I’d love to share with you what I’ve learned!

Keep reading for my list of the biggest social media lessons from the past 12 months. And feel free to add any further thoughts or learnings of yours into the comments!

1. How to Get Your Content Seen in the Facebook News Feed

Facebook has built a hugely sophisticated algorithm to help decide which of the thousands of possible stories from your friends and favorite pages will show up in your feed. One side effect of the algorithm is that people who like your page might never see your content.

We went on the hunt for information on how exactly the Facebook News Feed works and the measures that Facebook page owners can take to give their content the best chance of getting more reach.

Here’s a quick overview of some of the things the Facebook News Feed algorithm considers:

  • Posts with lots of comments
  • Posts with lots of likes
  • Post types that users seem to prefer more than others (e.g., photo, video, or status update)
  • Posts that reference a trending topic
  • Posts that receive a high volume of likes, comments, or shares in a short time
  • Link posts
  • Videos uploaded to Facebook that receive a large number of views or extended viewing duration
  • Posts that tag other pages within the text
  • Posts that are liked or commented on by one’s friends
  • Posts from pages that one interacts with often
  • Post types that one interacts with often
  • Posts from pages with complete profile information
  • Posts from pages where the fan base overlaps with the fan base of other known high-quality pages
  • Images and videos that have not previously appeared in the Open Graph
  • Links that have not been posted before

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For a complete overview of the do’s and don’ts of the Facebook News Feed, visit the full post, which we keep updated with all the latest news.

2. What Is the Ideal Image Size to Share on Twitter and Facebook?

Through much trial and error, we’ve found a single image size that works great for both Twitter and Facebook.

1,024 pixels wide by 512 pixels tall

For example:

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Twitter images of a 2:1 width-to-height ratio will appear fully in one’s Twitter timeline (with no cropping on the top or bottom). Facebook’s recommended ideal size is 1,200 pixels wide by 630 pixels tall, and there’s some room for flexibility there. Our 1024 x 512 image appears perfectly with zero cropping.

For Pinterest images, tall vertical images are best (these also look great on Google+).

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/GyuOC

Quicksprout – 8 Powerful Takeaways from Eye Tracking Studies

QuickSprout

April 30, 2014

By Neil Patel

eyetrackingWhen it comes to data, I’m convinced you can’t have enough. Crunching numbers, running tests, poring over metrics, analyzing trends — that’s what helps build great businesses and awesome websites.

One fascinating field of study of consumer behaviour is eye tracking. The information gleaned from eye tracking can help you become a more proficient web designer, content writer, conversion optimization expert, or online marketer.

I’ve summarized the bottom line results of some of these eye tracking tests and placed them into your hands so you can start seeing better results in your businesses.

Before we get started, let me explain what eye tracking is. Eye tracking basically measures where people look on a web page and for how long. Eye tracking data is presented visually, overlaid on the screen that the subjects were looking at, similarly to the image above.

With eye tracking, you can discover where a person looked first, second, third, and so on. You can find out what the user considers to be the most interesting part of the screen and how long he or she looked at certain areas.

Like any powerful data research, eye tracking studies aren’t cheap. The least expensive eye tracking devices cost around $5,000, which isn’t very affordable. But by analyzing public eye tracking studies, I came up with 8 takeaways that can help your online business.

See Full Story: http://ow.ly/vS9Sn

Contently – Twitter Timelines: A Cool New Storytelling Tool For Brands (Even When No One’s Breaking Up On Your Rooftop)

Contently

By Sam Petulla

November 27, 2013

Though long a premiere destination for brands looking to engage with consumers, Twitter hasn’t been the best place to tell comprehensive narratives native to the platform. After all, a brand’s Twitter profile usually contains a jumble of Tweets, replies, and mentions by other users, making the platform a great place to distribute and talk about stories, but not necessarily the best place to tell them.

That could be changing. Earlier this month, Twitter announced a new tool called Twitter timelines, and brand publishers should be paying attention to its storytelling potential.

Twitter Timelines create a custom, configurable stream of Tweets. The functionality is similar to Storify, and like Storify, Twitter timelines can be embedded most anywhere. Like here! Check out the example below.

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See Full Article: http://ow.ly/rdhup